• Ryanne Harper

Twin Peaks: 25 Years Later


I'm so glad to be back in Twin Peaks. It's so good to see everyone. It's like catching up with old friends, really weird old friends, but old friends none the less.

Showtime released the first four episodes so I stayed up way too late watching all four.

Episode one starts in the waiting room of the black lodge, the red room, where the real Agent Cooper has been trapped this whole time. Meanwhile, he has at least two doppelgangers wreaking havoc in the real world. One of them is a criminal with gross hair and I don't like him at all. The other is a man named Dougie who hires prostitutes and wears terrible jackets. I want my Agent Cooper. The cherry pie and coffee loving Agent Cooper.

Meanwhile, Ben still owns the Great Northern Hotel, Jerry still loves food, Lucy and Andy are annoying/dumb/sweet as ever, and Dr. Jacoby is still a weirdo. Now he's a weirdo who spray paints shovels in the woods. The log is still receiving messages, the log lady is still delivering those messages to a, now grey-haired, Deputy Hawk. James is still a cheesy biker, Shelly is still very cute, Sarah Palmer looks as rough as ever. Really, the only surprising thing is, Bobby Briggs is a police officer. I never would have guessed it. So, not a lot has changed. Except the show; it's changed quit a lot.

The original stayed, for the most part, in Twin Peaks; in the revival, we've been to Twin Peaks, New York, South Dakota, and Vegas so far.

New York: a guy is being paid by an unnamed billionaire to watch a clear box. Every now and again, something appears in the box. The guy brings a woman to the room and, while they're making out on the couch, something comes through the box and murders them.

South Dakota: a woman is found dead in her apartment, well, her detached head. The body belongs to a man. A high school teacher is arrested because his finger prints were found all over her apartment. The doppelganger with gross hair is in South Dakota. He's recently murdered a couple of people and, while the real Cooper is leaving the black lodge, he freaks out, gets in a car accidents, and ends up in prison.

Vegas: the bad jacket doppelganger resides in Vegas. I assume he's a realtor because he's meeting up with a prostitute in an empty house. We don't get to know the real Dougie because he is almost immediately replaced with the real Agent Cooper.

For me, the biggest difference is the entire tone of the show. It's scarier than the original. It could be because this thing wasn't in the original:

^This thing is the "evolution of the arm". I'd like to have my dancing man back, please.

I was going to try to summarize the plot, but I can't. I have too many questions; all of which I'm sure will be answered and the season will end with everything resolved. HAHAHAHAHAHA!

So, here's where we left off, once Cooper leaves the black lodge, he goes through a series of gates, one of which is the clear box in New York. He finally ends up in Vegas. He has no idea who he is, so, when the prostitute calls him Dougie, he goes with it. He's now Dougie. I actually like Cooper/Dougie; I especially like the way he wears his tie draped over his head.

The gross doppelganger is in a South Dakota prison. When he's identified as the missing Agent Cooper, Gordon Cole and Albert Rosenfield are called to come see him. I mean, he's been gone for 25 years; he probably has a lot to say. After interviewing him, neither are convinced it's really him. Because it isn't. They both decide an unnamed woman needs to be called in to see Cooper because she'll know for sure if it's him or not. I hope it's Audrey. Just because I really, really like Audrey. Also, last time we saw her, she had ineffectively chained herself to a bank vault, which then blew up. Is she even alive? I hope so.


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