• Ryanne Harper

7.23


For some of you, it's vacation season. I mean, I'm not going on vacation, but I'm also not salty at those of you who are. I'm repainting my house. So, you know, that's almost as fun as going on a trip.

So, this week, instead of new books, we're going to talk about old books that I loved on audio. Whether you're in the car listening with family or in your own head, audiobooks are an awesome way to pass the time.

Here are a few of my favorites:

American Gods, Neil Gaiman.

This book was decidedly not my jam when I first read it. My friends were living for it, though, so I gave it another shot except I read it with my ears instead of my eyes. I loved it. The special edition is a full cast dramatization, meaning characters have their own, unique voices, which in some cases really make the story come alive. It did for me. American Gods is now one of my favorites. So long as I'm listening to it.

Jurassic Park, Michael Crichton.

It is no secret that I love Jurassic Park. I'm wearing a JP shirt right now. Seriously. I listen to the film soundtrack on the reg. The theme song chills me out and helps me focus. Plus, I used to play the flute. The JP score was our jam and the flute part is so much fun. So, it holds a special place. It wasn't until a few years ago that I actually read the book. And, boy, is the audiobook so much fun. It's tense and exciting, everything you want in a dinosaur book.

Anything at all by David Sedaris.

I love personal essays. I also have a hard time with them. Despite the fact that the author published the essays and I know that, it feels like a violation of privacy to pop open a book of childhood stories and read them. But if the author reads them to you, it's totally different. Any David Sedaris will do, but When You're Engulfed in Flames is my favorite because of Six to Eight Black Men, a hilarious Christmas story from Holland that I have sense verified with my Hollish* friends.

My Life as a Goddess, Guy Branham

Another collection of personal essays. Guy has a fantastic voice, he's clever, he's kind, and you'll learn a few things about yourself and the world. Give it a listen.

Daisy Jones and the Six, Taylor Jenkins Reid

TJR has a cool style that lends itself well to audio. Daisy Jones and the Six tells the story of Daisy Jones, groupie turned rock star, and her band. The premise is, the band as gotten back together to do a documentary on what exactly caused them to split in the first place. So, same story told from at least seven different POVs. Each character has their own voice so you really do begin to feel like you're watching in interview on VH1 or something. It's really well done and, because it's Taylor Jenkins Reid, there is a twist. Already on the Daisy Jones and the Six train? Might I suggest Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by the same author?

Before you hit the road, hit up your library and pick up some books on tape. They will always and forever be books on tape to me. Or download a few. You might just find a new favorite.

*I know people from Holland are Dutch, not Hollish. My cousin, however, does not. I see her logic: Ireland = Irish. Scotland = Scottish. It would only follow that Holland = Hollish. Except it doesn't and I find it hilarious every time she says it.

#audiobooks #roadtrip #bookrecommendations

0 views

Recent Posts

See All

Reading in the Time of COVID

Readers, I have a confession to make. I'm having trouble reading. Me. The gal who reads at least seventy books a year. I'm having trouble. I think, with all that's going on in real life, I'm having tr